Articles Posted in The Basics of Social Security Disability Law

In our prior blog post we discussed how important it is to obtain supportive residual functional capacity questionnaires from one’s treating physicians.  In this follow-up blog, we’ll advice you as to the best way to go about requesting these forms from your doctors.

First, and of primary importance, it’s important to understand that an ongoing, consistent and lengthy relationship with your provider should be established prior to requesting they provide you with a questionnaire.   Your doctor is more interested in attempting to treat your condition and they want to see that this remains your priority as well.

In order to establish a claim for Social Security disability, one needs to show that they remain totally disabled from all forms of gainful employment, despite prescribed treatment, for what will be a year or longer.   With this in mind, exhausting medical treatment avenues prior to seeking opinions from your physicians needs to remain one’s first priority.   Continue reading

When proceeding with a Social Security disability claim or appeal, one of the most important considerations moving forward is whether your treating physician understands the seriousness of your medical conditions and the extent to which your problems are impacting your ability to function (both in and out of the home).  Ultimately, it’s important that your treatment providers are willing and able to express in a meaningful manner to the Social Security Administration (SSA) he nature and severity of your medical conditions and the extent to which you would be impacted in terms of your ability to function in a work site.

As part of the five (5) step sequential evaluation process, it is first necessary to establish that one is suffering from a medically determinable to severe impairment before SSA will next determine what symptoms could reasonably be expected to follow from such medically determinable impairments.  At that point, the Social Security regulations   require that the agency determine the persistence and severity of one’s symptoms and the manner in which it impacts one’s ability to function in a work setting.  This requires a determination of one’s Residual Functional Capacity, which is defined by the regulations as the most one can do despite their physical and mental limitations.

The Social Security regulations, for claims filed prior to March 27, 2017, provided that treating source opinions (which would include the opinions of one’s medical doctors) would carry controlling weight assuming that the  opinions were supported by the  not inconsistent with the treatment records of the provider.  Amendments made to the Social Security regulations  provide that for those claims filed on or after March 27, 2017, controlling weight will not be provided to the opinions of a treating source (such as one’s primary care physician, psychiatrist or surgeon).  Rather, their opinions will be evaluated along side those of non-treating sources using the same set of factors that have now been outlines at 20 C.F.R. 1520(c).  Medical sources have now been expanded to include that of licensed physician assistants, with respect evaluation of impairments that fall into their licensed scope of practice and for licensed advanced practice nurses, and yet the opinions of your own providers may no longer be presumed to carry more weight than one of Social Security’s providers that may be asked to see you.  Continue reading

The issue of substance abuse can come up in a variety of ways as part of a Social Security disability claim.  It might be a circumstance, very routine in this day and age, where somebody is taking too much of their narcotic medication.  Or, one might be taking medications that their friend or relative has suggested they try.  And then, there’s the very common scenario seen by our office where an individual is smoking marijuana or drinking alcohol in order to help them sleep at night.

Each of above scenarios can serve to derail a Social Security disability claim.  Understanding Social Security’s rules can help avoid the pitfalls we many times see individuals face as a result of the use of substances either not prescribed or in a manner that was not provided for by their physician(s).

There are two (2) provisions to keep in mind when considering an application for Social Security disability benefits.  20. C.F.R. §404.1530 provides that the Social Security Administration (SSA) will not find a claimant disabled if they, without good reason, fail to follow prescribed treatment.  Likewise, the Social Security Act additionally provides that one cannot be found entitled to benefits if in fact drug addiction or alcoholism is found to be a “contributing factor material to the determination of disability.”  

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It is extremely common for individuals applying for Social Security disability benefits to be experiencing problems with chronic pain, as one might imagine.  There are a panoply of medical conditions that could the cause of such symptoms, whether it’s from a degenerative disk disease in one’s back or neck, or, for example, from diabetic neuropathy that might cause excruciating, burning nerve pain in one’s feet.

The problem arises, however, where an individual is continuing to experience chronic pain and there is no easy offender at which to point the finger.   Chronic pain can arise from any one of a number of reasons and pointing to a diagnosed medical condition as the culprit may not be so easy.   It is important to understand that the inability to point to a medical condition as causing the impairment may end up proving somewhat problematic with a potential Social Security disability claim.

The Social Security Administration is required to undertake a five (5) step sequential evaluation process, which process is set forth by the Social Security regulations.  Step 1 requires that an individual is not gainfully employed.  Step 2 requires that a disability claimant is suffering from what is deemed to be a severe medically determinable impairment: an impairment is deemed to be “non-severe” if it does not significantly impact one’s ability to undertake basic physical or mental ability to do basic work-related functions. Continue reading

To those who do not practice Social Security disability law, the acronym DLI (which stands for “Date Last Insured”) does not mean much. However, if you are looking into applying for Social Security disability insurance (SSDI) benefits, understanding this term and knowing its importance can prove critical.

The Social Security regulations require, in order for one to collect a Social Security disability check that you be “insured” for benefits. Much like one needs to pay a premium for car or health insurance in order to be insured, in the event you are in an accident or incur a medical bill, one needs to be insured at the point in time one becomes disabled from working.   One’s DLI is the last day a disability claimant (who is claiming a disability other than blindness) meets the “insured” requirement for the disability program.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) will look to see if you have earned sufficient “quarters of coverage” (QOC) much in the way an insurance carrier would look to see if you’ve paid a premium in order to have coverage.   One earns a “quarter of coverage” or a “credit” based on ones Social Security taxed earnings in a particular year.  In 2017, a quarter of coverage or a credit is earned for each $1300.00  in Social Security taxed earnings you have posted to your Social Security record.  Thus, by working for an employer who has paid you $5200.00  (or by claiming a net profit of $5200.00 as a self-employed individual) during the course of 2017, you will accrue 4 quarters of coverage.   Continue reading

And so now you’ve been provided with your upcoming hearing date and time and you have no idea what to expect.  In part II, we’ll attempt to make you feel comfortable about the hearing process itself and what you should expect on the day of your hearing.

You can expect you’ll be provided advanced notice of your hearing before an administrative law judge (ALJ) at least 75 days in advance. Ordinarily, 3-4 days prior to the hearing you’ll receive a recorded message explaining that you should show up to the hearing an hour in advance.  It will be important to read carefully the notice of hearing you’ve been provided in the mail months in advance as it will contain important information such as where and when the hearing will be held, the items you should bring (such as a picture ID)  and what issues will be addressed at hearing.

Upon arrival at the hearing office, you can expect to be met by a security guard who will check you in and will scan you for weapons.  With this in mind, be sure not to bring with you anything that can be construed as a weapon: whether it be mace, a pocket knife or even needles you might require for your diabetes condition (leave this in your car, and should you need to test your sugars, plan on doing this outside of the hearing office location).

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One of the most typical misunderstood requirements for purposes of establishing a Social Security Disability claim is the duration requirement.  The Social Security Act and its corresponding regulations require that one prove they are suffering from a severe medical impairment that has lasted or or expected to last 12 months or longer, or result in death.   This provision has been interpreted quite strictly, and for anybody who is considering an application for Social Security disability benefits, it’s important to pay heed to this rule or a denial is very likely to follow.

The Social Security Act defines a “disability” as the “inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.”   42 U.S.C. §(d)(1)(A).    It is important to recognize that the language of the statute is meant to exclude from entitlement conditions those conditions which are of shorter term duration, and which will allow one to return to work within a matter of months.  For example, while having back surgery (even a multilevel fusion) may constitute a severe impairment which will cause one to be out of work for a stretch of time, most such surgeries would not anticipate a recovery time of a year or longer.

The more difficult type of situation comes about with conditions that may have periods of remission (with, for example, periods of exacerbation) which require you to remain out of work for stretches of time but might allow for returns to work for stretches of time.   In such a circumstance, one may still be able to reach the duration requirement of a year or longer by establishing that the attempts to return to work are what are deemed to be unsuccessful work attempts: this is something an experienced Social Security disability lawyer will be able to evaluate for you. Continue reading

And so for years you’ve been struggling with a bad back or with stiff hands that have more and more difficult to function at work.  You’ve gotten to the point where your employer is  no longer able to accommodate your missed days missed from work, or the slow down in your production.   You may be one of those individuals that just hates going to the doctor.

Or, you may be one those individuals that’s been going to the neighborhood chiropractor for years: he treats you week after week, telling you that you have what he believes to be severe arthritis of your back or a case of degenerative disk disease and lumbar radiculopathy.  He or she suggests that  you  to go ahead and apply for Social Security disability benefits (and that they’ll be supportive of your claim).

Unfortunately, the denial comes back from the Social Security Administration (SSA) in short order and it is now time to call the lawyer to see what can be done.   This is all too familiar a scenario in our office.  Whether it’s because health insurance has been an issue, or simply because someone doesn’t believe in doctors and they can tough it out (or, perhaps, because it’s difficult to find a doctor to treat your condition in your area): too many times we’re hearing from claimants who are wondering why their severe symptoms are simply not being listened to by SSA. Continue reading

The Social Security disability system is meant to assist those who remain long-term disabled for a year or longer.  While we many times focus on what is required to prove entitlement from a medical standpoint, we many times encounter potential clients who are seeking benefits for a long term disabling condition but do not meet the additional requirements to meet either the Social Security disability insurance (SSDI or Title II) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) requirements.  Below is a story of one such individual who recently contacted our office to determine why they were having a problem collecting a benefit.

Janice is a woman in her late 50’s from New Hampshire who has been suffering from a multiple chemical sensitivity disorder for many years which has hindered her ability to go out in public given the impact the fumes of various chemicals will have on her breathing (and which will otherwise cause her to become quite ill).  She worked for a number of years as a school bus driver until such time as the fumes from the bus itself became problematic for her.

Janice has seen a number of specialists at some of the most well-known and well-respected medical centers in Massachusetts and New Hampshire for her condition.   She has remained aggressive and persistent with her treatment.   Notwithstanding this fact, she has not been able to find any answers that have allowed her to return to work.

When pursuing a Social Security disability claim, it is important to understand that the disability determination process is not a perfect one. The majority of individuals are denied on their initial application, and, at the end of the appeals process, only 1 in 3 are ultimately approved for receipt of disability benefits.   When a claimant receives a partially favorable decision of their claim, which is not entirely uncommon, there are some very important considerations to take into account before deciding whether you should appeal that decision.  A wrong decision can prove to be devastating.

Receiving a partially favorable decision typically involves receiving a decision that means the Social Security Administration (SSA) has found you are “disabled” as that term is defined under Social Security’s rules, but that you are being found disabled with an onset date different than the one you alleged on your application for benefits.    For a Social Security disability lawyer, properly advising a claimant as to whether to appeal that decision is not always an easy one.

Initially, it may be clear that because of the need to show that one has remained disabled from a “severe medically determinable impairment” that either has met a medical listing of impairment or had remained severe and disabling such that the individual will remain disabled from all forms of gainful employment for what will be or what has been a year or longer (or is likely to result in death) that either the condition was not diagnosed or treated until a later point in time (and so the proof of the condition simply does not exist at an earlier time).  This may make the decision whether to appeal much easier.